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Pawpaw (Asimina triloba)

Pawpaw blossom Attracting Beetle A planting of Pawpaws below the Program shelter began blooming in early April. Colonies of Pawpaw are also found along several trails, but these rarely bloom. Pawpaw is the northernmost member of the subtropical and tropical plant family Annonaceae. The bell-shaped flowers have six brown to purple petals. The stamens and pistils are borne on a raised receptacle. The flowers have a fetid smell that attracts beetles and flies as pollinators.

Pawpaw fruit The large, fleshy, edible fruit (up to 16 cm long) matures in September and October and has been described as having a taste similar to a mixture of banana, mango and pineapple. Pawpaws are eaten raw or processed into deserts such as pies and ice cream, though they may cause stomach trouble for some people. They are eaten by a variety of wildlife. Recent research indicates Pawpaw has potential as an anti-cancer drug and as a pesticide. It is found throughout the Eastern U.S., except in New England, and as far west as Nebraska.

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University of Tennessee - Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center
901 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 · Telephone: 865-483-3571 · Email: UTforest@utk.edu