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Blackjack Oak (Quercus marilandica)

Blackjack Oak Leaf

Blackjack Oak is one of the less common oaks along Arboretum trails. Scattered individuals can be seen along Marsh Road and elsewhere on drier sites. Its presence most likely indicates past clearing for crops and/or a history of fire. Blackjack Oak may invade disturbed sites along with Shortleaf and Virginia Pine and can remain a component of the maturing deciduous forest for many years. Its distinctive leathery leaves are broadest at the tip with 3-5 bristle-tipped, rounded lobes. The lower leaf surface is velvety and rusty brown, while the upper surface is a shiny dark green.

Blackjack Oak Bark The bark is thick, blocky, and dark, almost black. It is found throughout the eastern US south from New York and the Midwestern states and west to Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, and Missouri. It is a major component of the Cross Timbers bordering the plains at the western edge of its distribution, and it is also an important constituent of the Pine Barrens in New Jersey. The wood has been used to make charcoal, railroad cross-ties, and fuel.

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University of Tennessee - Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center
901 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 · Telephone: 865-483-3571 · Email: UTforest@utk.edu